Faculty » Juliet McMullin

Juliet McMullin

Professor and Chair
Ph.D. 1999 University of California Irvine

Office: 1317 Watkins Hall
E-mail: juliet.mcmullin@ucr.edu

Juliet McMullin specializes in Cultural and Medical Anthropology. She is the author of The Healthy Ancestor: Embodied Inequality and the Revitalization of Native Hawaiian Health, and co-editor of the School of Advanced Research volume Confronting Cancer: Metaphors, Advocacy, and Anthropology. Professor McMullin has had an enduring interest in the production of health knowledge and inequalities, and a passion for translating that interest to her work with local communities and students. Professor McMullin is an active member of the UC Global Health Initiative, a board member for the Society for Medical Anthropology, and co-organizer for the Center for Ideas and Society Medical Narratives workgroup. Her current research examines the field of graphic medicine, the social and material role of graphic novels in narrative medicine and health inequalities.

The Healthy Ancestor Confronting Cancer

Community Collaborations:

Funded by the Cal Humanities Community Story Project Grant and in collaboration with Pacific Islander Health Partnership and Christen Marquez, we gathered oral histories with Pacific Islander elders and youth in southern California. See the work of our community Talk Story here.

Pacific Islander Talk Story

Courses:

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Spring 2010 class project. What it’s like to be a college student at the 5th most diverse campus in the US.

Courses
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ4wIPeoD7g

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

McMullin J., Bone, M., Pang, K., Pang, V., McEligot, AJ. Native Hawaiian Voices: Enhancing the Role of Cultural Values in Community Based Participatory Research. California Journal of Health Promotion. 2010; 8(SI):52-62.

McMullin JM, The Call to Life: Revitalizing a Healthy Hawaiian Identity. Social Science and Medicine. 2005; 61:809-820

Chavez LR, McMullinJM, Mishra SI, Hubbell FA. Beliefs Matter: Cultural Beliefs and the Use of Cervical Cancer Screening Tests. American Anthropologist 2001; 103:1-16.